In General Knowledge for the Family, Physical & Mental Health

Victims of Crime

People that are victims of crime go through so much emotional trauma and stress. However, they should not feel ashamed or guilty about it. If you or someone you know has been the victim of a crime, know that it is not your fault or theirs and that it is something that you should come forward about. Many agencies that support victims of crime are prepared to offer help. No matter what the crime was, if there was a victim involved through no fault of their own, there is support. At both the federal and state levels, the National Center for Victims of Crime, the FBI, and the Department of Justice have programs to assist the victim and their loss with hospital bills, counseling, and replacement of other losses. Communities also offer volunteer programs and agencies prepared to help victims of crime.

|SEE ALSO: Violence Definition|

The National Center for the Victims of Crime

The National Crime Victimization Survey offers support for all areas that a victim may need help with. Victim advocates are trained to support victims of crime, offering emotional support, information, and help in finding resources that may help them recover. Advocates in cities across America often go to court with the victim for support, and they will also contact criminal justice and social services to acquire additional help. Some states and cities run rape hotlines as well as crisis hotlines, support groups, and counseling. The specialists at NCVS are ready to help as soon as you contact their office. Support groups and hotlines are often listed online or in the phone book.

In the United States, the rate of violent victimization increased from 22.6 to 26.1 per 1,000 persons, over the age of 12. Unreported crime and simple assaults accounted for the majority of this increase, and the victims of crime are reported by law enforcement in the categories of murder, forcible rape, aggravated assault, sexual assault, robbery, non-negligence, manslaughter, aggravated assault, burglary, arson, larceny, and theft.

The Department of Justice divides crime into violent and property crimes and misdemeanors or felonies for the criminal, but whatever the type of crime is, the victim still suffers. Victims of crime can be of every race, color, religion, or economic background, and the assault may happen with no advance warning.

Who Are Victims of Crime?

A “victim of crime” or “crime victim” is an individual who suffers direct or threatened physical, emotional, or financial harm as a result of a crime.

Real-Life Victims of Crimes

Property crimes occur more frequently than violent crimes; victims have lost over $15.7 billion in 2010, which represents significant loss. Below is a news report from Orlando, Florida, USA.

The title reads as follows: four men arrested in relation to over 50 burglaries in vacation homes. There were no injuries, but this theft made the victim feel more vulnerable and exposed because of the loss of property and possessions.

The investigation has been ongoing since August when Osceola County Sheriff’s deputies took numerous burglary reports from victims renting time share properties. Similar burglaries were reported in Lake County and the city of Davenport. The four criminals were arrested for numerous burglaries and grand theft charges with losses reaching over $20,000 in laptops, cameras, and other technological items. These crimes had multiple victims, who suffered loss and trauma.

Rape Conviction Is 25 Years

Rape is a crime that steals dignity, self-esteem, and security from the victim. Another news story involves a rapist that was convicted, receiving 25 years. The jury used sexual battery with deadly force and false imprisonment for the charges because the victim was beaten, choked, and threatened with murder. The victim told the police that she had met the rapist on the street, and they had agreed to get a beer. It went downhill from there, as he dragged her by the hair onto his porch. Then, he put her in a choke hold and took her inside. Because of this violence, he received a long sentence. The victim was protected by the US law in the Crime Victim’s Right Act. The rapist had been previously arrested in another state for similar charges, but, in this sexual assault, the victim’s DNA was found on his person.

Shootings in Osceola Mall

Since the massacre shooting at Columbine School in 1999, more violent crimes have occurred in public arenas, such as schools, movie theatres, and recently in malls. Shootings like these take everyone completely by surprise, and innocent lives are taken. Anyone who is involved is physically and emotionally affected. Here is the account.

At 6:15pm, law enforcement reports that the owner of the restaurant, Puerto del Sol, was cleaning the store in the mall when gunfire erupted; he heard four to five random shots. He found a woman and a man shot and lying on the floor. Close by, an elderly man was shot. The store windows were shattered, but, fortunately, these three people were the only victims, and there were few shoppers that day.

The store owner then saw two men, age 24 and 21, running from the entrance where they had been. Out of nowhere, several people began to attend to the bleeding victims and called 911.The police arrived and separated the bystanders from the victims and followed the shooters who had jumped into their vehicle. Two streets over their car spun out of control and crashed. The shooters died in the collision; both had prior arrests.

The reason for this shooting was totally unnecessary. Inside the mall, the two shooters thought a stranger was whistling at them and they began an argument. From there, the two criminals pulled out their gun. Question: how many victims were there? Answer: Everyone in the mall: the three people shot and the two men whose perspective was so skewed.

Child Abuse – The Worst Abuse of All

Nearly 2.7 million cases of child abuse were reported last year, and the National Committee for Prevention of Child Abuse estimated that 1,385 children died of abuse. Some of the increase was attributed to a more violent society, drug abuse, and harsh economic times. The number of child abuse cases reported in the United States has risen each year since the committee began compiling statistics in 1976: This is a sad statistic for the country.

Orlando, Florida

The girl was 7 years old. Her father, raising the child by himself, was just 23, and Orange County detectives said that the offense that triggered his outbreak was losing the cell phone he had given her. Terrified of what might happen, she lied and said it was stolen. When the father learned the truth, he beat his daughter so badly he broke her spine, bruised her spleen, and made her face “unrecognizable” to her own grandmother. When he was finished, he called relatives in Washington State and persuaded them to fly out and take the girl, who he put on the plane in a veiled costume. This seven-year-old became a victim in a manner that no child should go through, but she did live.

What to Do if Someone Has Been a Victim of a Violent Crime

If you or someone you know has been the victim of a crime, the trauma that has been created is not your fault and there is no reason to hide it or feel ashamed by it. No matter what the crime is, if there was a victim who became involved through no fault of their own, there is support. At both the federal and state levels, the National Center for Victims of Crime, the FBI, and the Department of Justice have programs to assist the victim and their loss, including hospital bills, counseling, or replacing other losses.

National Crime Victimization Survey

The National Crime Victimization Survey is the nation’s primary source of information on criminal victimization. Each year, data is obtained from about 90,000 households, nearly 160,000 persons. Each recipient is interviewed twice a year, and the survey is focused on victims of rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated, simple assault, theft, household burglary, and motor vehicle theft. The National Crime Victimization Survey is the national forum for victims and the impact of the crime. They also provide assistance for any victims of crime.

The National Center for the Victims of Crime

The National Center for the Victims of Crime offers support for all areas that a victim may need help with. The victim advocates are trained to support victims of crime, offering emotional support, information, and help in finding resources. Advocates in cities across America often go to court with victims for support, and they will also contact criminal justice and social services to acquire help for victims. Some states and cities run rape hotlines as well as crisis hotlines, support groups, and counseling. The specialists at NCVC are ready to help as soon as you contact their office, and often these support groups and hotlines are listed online or in the phone book.

 

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